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Filipinos take top prizes in Japan soy sauce cook fest

Two Japan-based Filipinos bagged top prizes in a soy sauce cooking competition. The Japan Times reported that Clair Ocampo, a Filipina based in Saitama Prefecture, won first prize for her "pork back ribs adobo and banana with burned brown sugar" at the eighth Soy Sauce Recipe & Story Contest. The competition was held at the Royal Park Hotel In Tokyo. “I have loved adobo since my childhood. I used soy sauce and brown sugar to better bring out the pork’s flavor. Also, to give it an interesting taste, I used hakkaku spice and laurel leaves. My dish is unique and original,” Ocampo told The Japan Times. Another Saitama-based Filipino, Justin De Jesus, tied for the second prize with his “Philippine beef steak, with a yuzu citrus and soy sauce flavor.” De Jesus said …

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Paseo de Roxas to close Oct. 23 for Makati Street Meet

Paseo de Roxas will be closed to traffic on October 23, Sunday, as it will turn into a giant Halloween village from 4–9 p.m. It’s part of Make It Makati’s celebration of Halloween as it hosts its second culinary street meet. “Halloween is always fun for kids, so we brought this tradition to Paseo de Roxas, and made it even better. We’d like the Makati community to enjoy this time-honored activity, right here where they live,” said Shiella Aguilar, Project Development Manager of Makati. Make It Makati has invited vendors from the famed Salcedo Market—Monster Burger, Elbert’s Sandwiches, Saikuro Steak, La Cuisine, Old Fashion Tapa House, Chicken Inasal, Jiro’s Lechon, No Fat No Glory, Llanes Farm, Delicane, The Commissary Kitchen, Authentic House of Curry, Merry Moo, Gostoso Piri Piri, Milea Bee Farm, Rafik …

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Travels with your tummy

By Kaye Estoista-Koo Put together a young host-chef and an old geezer (as he calls himself) known for his many, many travel shows and you get organized chaos. Hong Kong based-chef Christian Yang and the world’s most traveled man Ian Wright have combustible chemistry, as Christian puts it. He says, “We hit it off because we like poking fun at stuff and not taking each other too seriously, although I take thin gs more seriously than him...” Their easy going banter and constant ribbing at one another provide for very interesting TV material in season three of A Taste of Hong Kong. A Taste of Hong Kong is a TLC and Hong Kong Tourism Board partnership and they are actively pushing it in the Philippines, with the 645,000 Filipinos visiting Hong Kong just in 2015. Pinoys are hungry for Hong Kong and Pinoy families choose …

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Inspiring chef, fabulous food

Millions of Filipino TV viewers around the world have fallen in love with a chef named Boy, whose folksy ways and undeniable Visayan accent understate his achievements in the highly competitive international world of culinary arts. Chef Pablo “Boy” Logro disarms everyone, from TV audiences to hotel diners, with his rags-to-riches true story of a poor boy from the hinterlands of Mindanao working as a restaurant helper and working his way up the kitchen ladder to become the country’s first ever de luxe hotel Filipino executive chef. After years of cooking for high society clientele around the world, Chef Boy has come home to roost, and to serve as inspiration while continuing to do what he loves most: preparing dishes that are beautiful, nutritious, and ecologically sound. South of the Border — Our first encounter with Chef Boy’s cooking was at the Acacia Hotel in Alabang, which is …

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A Golden Evening

I have to hand it to FIJEV buddy and wine expert Sherwin Lao and his partners, people who are in the business of wine and know the fun in its appreciation by involving their group’s clients and friends with some very creative activities. I have personally attended many of their tasting events that limit the attendees to a more focused group. Though the wines may be pedigreed or need a serious form of attention and critiquing, the Golden Wines group certainly did not fall short of their idea of bringing their invitees on a tasting journey of French wines from the Rhone, Bordeaux, and the Champagne region in a preliminary three-course dinner that ended in a well selected cheese table to mop up the remaining wines on the table. The diner is …

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US fast food chain in Malaysia told to change hot dog name

KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia — Hot dogs, or at least the name, will soon be off the menu for a U.S. fast food chain selling the popular snack in Malaysia. The chain, Auntie Anne's, has been told by Islamic authorities that its popular Pretzel Dog, which contains no dog meat, has to be renamed as it is confusing for Muslim consumers. The Malaysian Islamic Development Department has told the U.S. company to banish the word "dog" from its menu and suggested that the frankfurter wrapped in a pretzel be called Pretzel Sausage as part of conditions to obtain halal certification based on Islamic dietary laws. Dogs are deemed unclean in Islam. "It is more appropriate to use the name Pretzel Sausage," the department's halal director Sirajuddin Suhaimee told local media. The move is not …

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Affordable ramen and churros from an eye candy

Fan of ramen and churros but find these famed comfort foods too pricey? Head to Caloocan City for these fare at affordable prices... with the added value of an eye candy. A widely liked Facebook photo by Mauricio Brozo shows a food stall at Grace Park, Caloocan City selling ramen and churros that provide a bang for the buck. It sells the famed Japanese noodles for P25, with a lighter version (without pork) for only P15. At Japanese restaurants, ramen of different flavors and sizes cost from P100 to P400 or higher. Unlike other outdoor noodles or mami sold by sidewalk hawkers, this street-style ramen promises an authentic Japanese feel as the vendor himself is Japanese—and a certified looker. The stall also sells ‘golden churros’ for just P5 apiece. The Latin American snack can be served …

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Caterers cooking up ideas for success

In every special event, social gathering and corporate meeting, food quality and presentation matter. While caterers old and new follow this same ethos, the proliferation of more players in the industry cooks up more competition. This encourages them to constantly innovate while still looking at their tried and tested recipe for success. Cuisine improvisation For nearly four decades, Albergus Catering prides itself for offering Asian and Western menus for events such as weddings, gala, fundraisers, etc. It has earned a reputation for mastering the art of tweaking their international menu to satisfy the Filipinos’ tastes. And a key factor to improving and improvising their menu selection is traveling. “I’ve always had fond memories traveling and eating abroad while growing up. We attend local and international food shows and conventions regularly,” said Mary Ann Unson-Jugo, chief operating officer of …

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The eggs factor

Whether on news coverages or at home, eggs play a big role in my daily life as a working single grandmother. They are sold boiled everywhere: on buses, roadside eateries and sari-sari stores, providing instant snacks. At home, they can be made into instant soups, omelets, French toast. They can also be scrambled, baked, or stuffed. The ultimate convenience food, eggs are packed with protein and 18 vitamins and minerals. They’re also extremely versatile, making them the most important ingredient in your fridge! They’re nutritious, they taste great, and their physical properties and components make them indispensable in the kitchen. Eggs have qualities on which many cooking techniques and recipes depend, as explained in www.eggs.ca.  LEAVENING Eggs have a great ability to puff up foods when air is beaten into them. Egg whites, when beaten, create foam that has more stability and volume than whole eggs or yolks. Egg whites, when whipped, can expand up to eight …

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Tapas and wine

The shared history of Spain and Britain, if you look at it from the point of view of sherry, is pretty interesting. Britain’s love affair with sherry, a fortified wine, began in the early 16th century. And despite the Anglo-Spanish War, which was waged on and off for about 80 years, this love continued to grow. So much so that I read in an online article that when Sir Francis Drake captured the harbor in the port of Cadiz, Spain in 1587 he had one goal—to bring butts (a barrel that holds about 600 liters) of sherry back to England, a whopping 2,900 of them. In The Oxford Companion to Wine, an Englishman, Robert Blake Byass, is one of those credited with initiating an unprecedented sherry boom in the mid-19th century. Byass went into partnership with Manuel Gonzalez, who owned …

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