mb.com.ph | Philippine News | Author Archives
Home » Entries posted by Zac Sarian
Zac Sarian
Zac Sarian

4 easy ways to remove pesticide residues in vegetables

People are getting increasingly health-conscious these days. They want pesticide-free vegetables and other food products. They don’t mind paying a higher price for vegetables that are claimed to be organic or those grown without using chemical pesticides. The sad truth, however, is that there is not enough organically grown vegetables in the country. Most of the vegetables we eat are produced the conventional way. This means the farmers usually use chemical pesticides to protect the plants from pests and diseases. At any rate, here are four easy ways to remove pesticide residues in the vegetables we cook. Dr. Susan May F. Calumpang of UP Los Baños (UPLB)shared with us the four easy techniques. She is concerned because one can never be sure whether or not the vegetables available in the market have …

Read More

P188,000 profit from ginger trial planting

There’s money in farming if you are hard working enough and open-minded to adopt improved farming practices. Just like Tannie Zaulda, 48, a former soldier who made a profit of P188,000 last year from a trial planting of 120 kilos of ginger seed pieces in his two-hectare farm in Barangay Julita, Libacao, Aklan. The inspiring story was sent to us as a photo release from Melpha M. Abello, a former staff of Agriculture magazine who opted to free herself from the monstrous traffic jam in Metro Manila. She went back to her hometown and today, she is enjoying traffic-less commute to her new job at the Aklan State University. Tannie planted ginger as an intercrop between his Señorita bananas. From that initial planting, he was able to harvest three tons which gave …

Read More

Enterprising lady operates a model farm

Mary Ann Wu is a livewire of a woman who operates a five-hectare farm in Southern Luzon and a garden supplies store in Quezon City. She spends long hours in her farm, Evergreen Tropical Plants in Sto. Tomas, Batangas, doing a lot of hands-on farming that she loves to do. Her farm, a 5-hectare part of a bigger still undeveloped property, is very well organized. There, she grows a lot of ornamental plants, high-value crops and some livestock and poultry. In a way, the financial crisis in 1997 was some sort of a blessing in disguise. It was instrumental in giving birth to Mary Ann Wu’s farm in Sto. Tomas which is starting to become a farm tour destination. In fact, the AANI farm tour will visit the place this Sunday, October …

Read More

Small dairy project on installment

Here is one investment scheme in a small dairy project that is especially designed for OFWs, retirees, and aspiring agri-entrepreneurs. It can be obtained through installment if one does not have the cash right away. This is the Dairy Gold dairy investment scheme being offered by King Ranch Dairy Farm, which has a thriving milking herd in Rosario, Batangas. It is run by the father-and-son tandem of Alex and King Carlos. Based on their own experience, small scale dairying can be a good money-making proposition that can be undertaken in many parts of the country. Here is how the scheme works. The investor can choose from three packages what he thinks best suits his circumstances. Package A consists of three Holstein-Sahiwal heifers that are already three months pregnant. Package B consists of …

Read More

How to remove chemical residue in vegetables

Would you believe that by soaking your vegetables in a solution of two teaspoons of vinegar in a liter of water you can remove up to 80 percent of the pesticide residues? Yes, that’s one of four easy ways you can remove pesticide residues recommended by Dr. Susan May F. Calumpang of UP Los Baños. She and members of her team have found that out in a research project funded by PCAARRD, an agency of the Department of Science and Technology. The study was aimed at establishing mitigating measures to minimize pesticide residues in intact and fresh-cut vegetables and sprouts. The research team now suggests four very easy and simple ways of removing pesticide residues in vegetables. Here they are: 1. Mix two teaspoons of vinegar into 4 cups of water and use …

Read More

Interesting agri-people at Agrilink

At trade shows like the recent Agrilink, you don’t only see new products on exhibit, you also meet interesting agri-people who are full of valuable information and ideas concerning agribusiness. One such fellow is Arleen Valera, a UP Los Baños graduate who for many years was the biggest producer of sweet corn in the Philippines. We remember reading about his success in an issue of Readers’ Digest. Oh yes, that was how successful he was. Then we have lost track of him, only to meet him on the last day of Agrilink 2016. Where did he go? Why did he give up his sweet corn business? He said he was a victim of climate change. He confessed that when his sweet corn business was devastated by strong typhoons five years in a row, …

Read More

Bicolor waxy corn, anyone?

Boiled corn is a favorite snack food for the young and adults alike. Years back, we enjoyed the small ears of native glutinous or “malagkit” white corn. Then the yellow sweet and super sweet varieties came along, which are still among the favorites. Later came the so-called waxy corn varieties. These are hybrid varieties with tender kernels that are sweet and somewhat glutinous. The early waxy varieties were pure white and because they are hybrids, the ears are much bigger than the old native glutinous corn. The latest to be introduced in the local market is the so-called bicolor waxy corn. This has multicolored kernels, some of which are dark purple, some light red, violet, and in between. There have been bicolor varieties that were earlier introduced but the latest we know …

Read More

Duterte dreams of corruption-free Agri Department

One of the big changes that President Rodrigo Duterte wants to implement today is to make the Department of Agriculture corruption-free, at least, during his term of office. In his speech read by Undersecretary Evelyn Laviña at the opening of Agrilink 2016 at the World Trade Center, the president said he has instructed the DA to link up with the Bureau of Customs and other relevant agencies to once and for all stop and never to allow ever again the smuggling of rice, meat products and other agricultural products like onion, garlic and ginger. The president said he truly appreciates the “huge assistance that private sector groups like FRLD provide us to spur the growth of agricultural production and trade through agricultural trade fairs like Agrilink.” FRLD is the Foundation for Resource …

Read More

All roads lead to Agrilink trade show

All roads, so to speak, lead to the World Trade Center in Pasay City as agricultural enthusiasts all over the country flock to the three-day Agrilink trade show which starts today and will end on Saturday. Evelyn Laviña, Department Agriculture undersecretary for agribusiness and high-value crops, will lead the government officials in the ceremonial opening of the event at 9 a.m. today together with personalities involved in agricultural pursuits like Sen. Cynthia Villar, government agency directors, foreign ambassadors and others. Laviña is scheduled to address issues of sustainability, food security, global competitiveness and agricultural resiliency, according to Antonio V. Roces, president of the Foundation for Resources Linkage and Development (FRLD), the company responsible for staging the annual event which is considered the mostly attended event of its kind in the Philippines. More than …

Read More

From degraded streams to fish habitat

A retired lady professor from University of the Philippines Los Baños (UPLB) who is an environmentalist has developed a practical technique of rehabilitating polluted streams and shallow rivers so that they can become sustainable fish habitats that will be sources of food for communities. The lady is Dr. Macrina T. Zafaralla, emeritus professor of the Institute of Biological Sciences at UP Los Baños. Her technique comes by the forbidding name of Aquatic Macrophyte Biosorption System (AMBS). However, it is very simple in layman’s terms. The AMBS simply involves putting a barrier consisting of bamboo poles across the stream to keep in place the “macrophytes” which are actually either kangkong or water hyacinth. The water plants serve as a filter to the floating solid pollutants while the roots develop into a mat that …

Read More

Page 1 of 13123Next ›Last »