Property design: Shaping the future of human experience | mb.com.ph | Philippine News
Home  » Others » Property » Property design: Shaping the future of human experience

Property design: Shaping the future of human experience

Design shapes the future of human experience. From the design of a table influencing how people interact during a meal, to the physical design of a mobile phone determining how it will be used, the importance of design is key in every industry.

In commercial property development, design defines a workspace’s functionality. Office spaces have evolved considerably over the years but one thing has remained the same: office space layouts have always been anchored on the specific demands of a company’s workforce and the nature of the employer’s business.

One World Place is the first commercial office building in Southeast Asia to feature Monsoon Windows for natural ventilation. These windows use outside air to cool the building’s public spaces during temperate months, lowering energy use.

One World Place is the first commercial office building in Southeast Asia to feature Monsoon Windows for natural ventilation. These windows use outside air to cool the building’s public spaces during temperate months, lowering energy use.

Design forecast

Earlier this year, Gensler — an American design and architectural firm — published their 2016 Design Forecast which contained insights from their global teams on how people will live, work, and play in the cities from this year up until 2025.

The forecast lists more than 30 trends and six overarching meta-trends all of which already have observable beginnings even here in the Philippines. These trends center on the community, the workplace, and the lifestyle sectors.

One of the most interesting trends that the forecast listed is the insight that the urban workforce will reshape work and its settings. Moreover, it says that in order to get the very best from employees, organizations, including developers and designers, must come up with a strong, engaging workplace.

Design in Philippine real estate

Local property developers have gradually been applying these global workplace design trends to their new properties. One such developer is Daiichi Properties, which teamed up with Gensler’s design team for three of the former’s latest vertical developments: One World Place, World Plaza, and The Finance Centre in Bonifacio Global City.

“Gensler is our collaborative partner and architect. Working with them has helped us to better understand what it is tenants really want from a building. We then apply this global thinking to the Philippine market when designing and constructing our projects,” stressed Architect Reynaldo Ramon C. Fuentez Jr., VP for Project Management Group of Daiichi Properties.

Wellness priority

Emphasizing that well being is the new global currency, the Design Forecast also mentions that new tools will allow people to monitor not just their own personal wellness, but also how healthy their work settings are. As such, organizations will have to take providing wellness seriously in terms of workplace design.

“It’s more than just the physical look of the buildings. We’ve also been seeing to it that the technical aspects of Daiichi’s office buildings promote a healthy workplace,” Fuentez noted. “For one, the HVAC systems embedded in them have healthier effects on our tenants compared to non-green properties.”

Pursuing more of their own green initiatives through biophilia-based designs, Daiichi’s World Plaza and The Finance Centre will redefine Bonifacio Global City’s urban landscape by having open-landscaped plazas with water features blending seamlessly with the community.

Employees as top-of-mind

While the Philippines continues to progress as a global economic force with many multinationals moving to and setting up shop in the country and local companies expanding on their own, it is imperative that property developers bear in mind the dynamic workplace design trends here and abroad.

Additionally, Eric Manuel, Daiichi Properties’ VP for Business Development, added that, “Workers are gravitating toward social settings, apart from home and work. New and repositioned ‘office buildings’ are growing to make room for them. As mobile workers switch between office space and ‘third place’ alternatives, owners and developers that focus on transit-served, mixed-use districts may have an edge in attracting them.”