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Black pepper in your home or your farm

Whether you reside in the urban area or in the province, you can grow black pepper for home use of for commercial purposes. Black pepper is very easy to grow with minimal care.

In the urban area, you can grow your ‘paminta’ in two ways. You can grow plants that will grow up high, attaching themselves to a support, or you can grow dwarf black pepper in pots or containers that may be just one to two feet tall.

Dwarf black pepper? The late Salvador Dolar who studied at UP Los Baños found that by rooting fruiting vines, instead of runners, and planting them in a container, the plants will not grow tall. Nevertheless, they are also fruitful.

  • PROLIFIC BLACK PEPPER – The Paniyur variety of black pepper from India is really prolific. Urban dwellers can grow a few in their home garden for their own use. For commercial production, trees like mahogany and some others could be used as their support. Four rooted cuttings, for instance, could be planted at the foot of each mahogany tree. In one and a half years, the cuttings will start bearing fruits. In the urban area, black pepper can even be made to grow on concrete post or fence. When grown in pots or containers, fruiting cuttings will remain dwarf but also fruitful.

    PROLIFIC BLACK PEPPER – The Paniyur variety of black pepper from India is really prolific. Urban dwellers can grow a few in their home garden for their own use. For commercial production, trees like mahogany and some others could be used as their support. Four rooted cuttings, for instance, could be planted at the foot of each mahogany tree. In one and a half years, the cuttings will start bearing fruits. In the urban area, black pepper can even be made to grow on concrete post or fence. When grown in pots or containers, fruiting cuttings will remain dwarf but also fruitful.

  • THAI MANGOES – Mango varieties from Thailand are very nice to eat as green mango because they are sweet and not sour even if they are not ripe. A few varieties have been introduced in the Philippines. These include the Lubdok which has bluish skin, the Eating Green, Chokanan, Nam dok Mai, Falan and others. If produced in volume, the fruits could be sold in supermarkets as green mango. Of course, they are also nice to eat as ripe fruits.

    THAI MANGOES – Mango varieties from Thailand are very nice to eat as green mango because they are sweet and not sour even if they are not ripe. A few varieties have been introduced in the Philippines. These include the Lubdok which has bluish skin, the Eating Green, Chokanan, Nam dok Mai, Falan and others. If produced in volume, the fruits could be sold in supermarkets as green mango. Of course, they are also nice to eat as ripe fruits.

  • LONGKONG IN CANLUBANG – A Longkong lanzones that was planted two months earlier is doing fine at the Canlubang farm of Tito Locsin. It has produced a set of new leaves, most likely the result of Durabloom organic fertilizer and adequate watering. Longkong is a Thai variety which produces sweet latexless fruits. Given the right care, the grafted tree should start fruiting in six years. Posing with the young tree are Jun Malicdem, Felix Yulo and Tito Locsin.

    LONGKONG IN CANLUBANG – A Longkong lanzones that was planted two months earlier is doing fine at the Canlubang farm of Tito Locsin. It has produced a set of new leaves, most likely the result of Durabloom organic fertilizer and adequate watering. Longkong is a Thai variety which produces sweet latexless fruits. Given the right care, the grafted tree should start fruiting in six years. Posing with the young tree are Jun Malicdem, Felix Yulo and Tito Locsin.

  • KANGKONG FOR SEED PRODUCTION – You can produce your own upland kangkong seeds for planting. You just allow your plants to mature and bear flowers that will eventually produce seeds. The seeds you harvest can be used for planting. Kangkong produces a lot of seeds. Just don’t harvest the tops if you want to produce seeds. Seeds will readily germinate. Photo shows flowering upland kangkong.

    KANGKONG FOR SEED PRODUCTION – You can produce your own upland kangkong seeds for planting. You just allow your plants to mature and bear flowers that will eventually produce seeds. The seeds you harvest can be used for planting. Kangkong produces a lot of seeds. Just don’t harvest the tops if you want to produce seeds. Seeds will readily germinate. Photo shows flowering upland kangkong.

  • DRASTICALLY PRUNED MANGO TREES – In Pingtung county in southern Taiwan, farmers plant their mango trees about only four meters apart. The trees are not allowed to grow more than six feet by drastic pruning. This technique works fine for Taiwan mango growers. The fruits are very low and can be easily wrapped or bagged to protect them from fruitflies. Harvesting is also very easy. The technique has not been tried with the carabao mango. Maybe, somebody should conduct an experiment to find out if the technique will work fine with carabao mangoes.

    DRASTICALLY PRUNED MANGO TREES – In Pingtung county in southern Taiwan, farmers plant their mango trees about only four meters apart. The trees are not allowed to grow more than six feet by drastic pruning. This technique works fine for Taiwan mango growers. The fruits are very low and can be easily wrapped or bagged to protect them from fruitflies. Harvesting is also very easy. The technique has not been tried with the carabao mango. Maybe, somebody should conduct an experiment to find out if the technique will work fine with carabao mangoes.

  • LADY INVENTOR – Olivia Limpe-Aw is the latest inventor to join the Filipino Inventors Society with the invention of a utility model that uses mango as base for rhum, and her latest procedure in aging using charred oak chips. She is the fifth-generation and first female chair and chief executive officer of the 162-year-old Destileria Limtuaco. To inventors, she advises: “Study what is not yet in the market, then create something to address that need – then you can make it big.” (S&T Media Service)

    LADY INVENTOR – Olivia Limpe-Aw is the latest inventor to join the Filipino Inventors Society with the invention of a utility model that uses mango as base for rhum, and her latest procedure in aging using charred oak chips. She is the fifth-generation and first female chair and chief executive officer of the 162-year-old Destileria Limtuaco. To inventors, she advises: “Study what is not yet in the market, then create something to address that need – then you can make it big.” (S&T Media Service)

The other way is to grow plants that were propagated from runners or non-fruiting stems. They can be made to attach themselves to a living tree like mahogany or some other species. Or the vines can be made to attach themselves to a cement post.

One housewife from Parañaque once told us that the Paniyur black pepper that she bought from us attached itself to their  concrete fence and it bore fruit without trouble.

In the farm, you can grow black pepper on mahogany trees. Dr. Rene Sumaoang had planted a lot of trees along the road in his farm in Sta. Ignacia, Tarlac. He planted  three or four rooted cuttings at the foot of each tree and in just one-and-a-half years, he started harvesting from his plants.

The beauty about black pepper is that it does not need very special care. Once planted, it does not have to be taken care of every so often. As per our experience, putting a handful of processed organic fertilizer at its base once a month will keep the plants in good stead. If you want to maintain a height that will make it easy to harvest, the fruits you can prune the vines to about six to seven feet high. The topcuts may be rooted for additional plantings.

Black pepper can be planted even in remote areas. That’s because the fruits are not heavy to transport. And the dried peppercorn does not spoil easily for as long as it is well dried before storage.

Enterprising entrepreneurs don’t only make money from peppercorns. Rooted cuttings for planting can also be a good source of income. Rooted plants are currently being sold at R35 apiece.

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PINOY MICROSATELLITE – The Pinoy Microsatellite developed by scientists and engineers of the Department of Science and Technology and which is slated to be launched into space shortly will benefit Filipino farmers in a big way, according to the DOST statement.

How? Once launched into space, the microsatellite will be able to send useful data on weather systems which are crucial for farmers to time or adjust their planting methods and procedures in the light of climate change. They will be able to determine what crops to plant, when to plant, and how else they can adjust to the changing climate.

At the same time, the satellite technology will enable the national weather agency, PAGASA, to make accurate forecasts and weather monitoring. The agency will be able to predict extreme weather systems like the El Niño phenomenon that can dramatically affect agricultural productivity.

Aside from information that is useful to agriculture, the microsatellite technology can be used to monitor our forest cover and natural resources. It can help concerned agencies to implement a responsive disaster risk management program like Project NOAH, enhance water resources management systems and improve weather monitoring and forecasting.