Farming the sea in Lanao Del Norte | mb.com.ph | Philippine News
Home  » Others » Agriculture » Farming the sea in Lanao Del Norte

Farming the sea in Lanao Del Norte

Government projects that showcase practical opportunities whether in farming or fisheries, will always have positive results.

Just like the mariculture park project in Lanao del Norte which was launched in 2010 in Panguil Bay. There, the Bureau of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources (BFAR) demonstrated fish farming in the ocean with circular and square cages for culturing bangus and other species.

The first cycle showcased the stocking of 20,000 bangus fingerlings in one circular cage with a diameter of 8 meters. Bangus grows well in sea water. In four months of culture, and spending P250,000 on feeds, they harvested eight tons. Half of the harvest was sold to employees of the government at a discounted price of P110 per kilo whereas the other half was sold through the ordinary market at P120 per kilo.

  • FISHPENS IN PANGUIL BAY – In 2010, a 1,200-hectare mariculture park was established in Panguil Bay through the initiative of the provincial government of Lanao del Norte. The Bureau of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources (BFAR) was tasked to put up a showcase of  fish farming in the sea by installing circular and square  fish cages for the culture of bangus and other species. One positive effect of the mariculture project is that the local fisherfolks have adopted the technology of farming the sea. With the help of the local government units, many of them have put up their own fish cages for culturing bangus. Photo shows some of the fishpens owned by fish farmers from the capital town of Tubod.

    FISHPENS IN PANGUIL BAY – In 2010, a 1,200-hectare mariculture park was established in Panguil Bay through the initiative of the provincial government of Lanao del Norte. The Bureau of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources (BFAR) was tasked to put up a showcase of fish farming in the sea by installing circular and square fish cages for the culture of bangus and other species. One positive effect of the mariculture project is that the local fisherfolks have adopted the technology of farming the sea. With the help of the local government units, many of them have put up their own fish cages for culturing bangus. Photo shows some of the fishpens owned by fish farmers from the capital town of Tubod.

  • STEPHEN HARUN is in charge of fisheries projects in Lanao del Norte. He says that many fisherfolks from the towns of Lala, Baroy and Tubod have put up their own fishpens in Panguil Bay after seeing the showcase put up by BFAR at the mariculture park. Bangus grows fast in saline water and their taste is superior to those cultured in freshwater

    STEPHEN HARUN is in charge of fisheries projects in Lanao del Norte. He says that many fisherfolks from the towns of Lala, Baroy and Tubod have put up their own fishpens in Panguil Bay after seeing the showcase put up by BFAR at the mariculture park. Bangus grows fast in saline water and their taste is superior to those cultured in freshwater

  • LEONCIO BAGOL is the general manager of the Matungao Community Cooperative which is engaged in converting coconut husks into coco peat, coco coir and geonet. Aside from the 50 to 60 workers in the factory of the co-op, some 500  households are making twines out of the coco fiber at home, each earning R2 per 15-meter twine

    LEONCIO BAGOL is the general manager of the Matungao Community Cooperative which is engaged in converting coconut husks into coco peat, coco coir and geonet. Aside from the 50 to 60 workers in the factory of the co-op, some 500 households are making twines out of the coco fiber at home, each earning R2 per 15-meter twine

  • POUNDING BANANA NILUPAK AS TOURIST ATTRACTION - In Taiwan leisure farms, pounding sticky rice is a popular recreational activity for tourists. In the Philippines, pounding the local “banana linupak” could as well be developed as an attraction in farm resorts. Just like what Norma Villanueva (in photo) experienced when the members of the Philippine Horticultural Society visited the Vine Leaf Leisure Farm of Zeny Urbina in Antipolo City. Linupak is made by pounding boiled Saba banana, later on eaten with grated coconut and sugar.

    POUNDING BANANA NILUPAK AS TOURIST ATTRACTION - In Taiwan leisure farms, pounding sticky rice is a popular recreational activity for tourists. In the Philippines, pounding the local “banana linupak” could as well be developed as an attraction in farm resorts. Just like what Norma Villanueva (in photo) experienced when the members of the Philippine Horticultural Society visited the Vine Leaf Leisure Farm of Zeny Urbina in Antipolo City. Linupak is made by pounding boiled Saba banana, later on eaten with grated coconut and sugar.

  • HEALING AND ECO-TOURISM DESTINATION – Minda Regis (left), Lanao del Norte’s tourism officer, usually brings tourists to Fr. Rodulfo Galenzoga’s Dapit Alim, a healing and eco-tourism destination up in the mountain in Tubod, the capital town. The 5.5-hectare retreat place is heavily reforested since Fr. Galenzoga is also a strong advocate of forest conservation. Both Christians and Muslims visit the place that is basically a center for prayer, reconciliation and holistic healing.

    HEALING AND ECO-TOURISM DESTINATION – Minda Regis (left), Lanao del Norte’s tourism officer, usually brings tourists to Fr. Rodulfo Galenzoga’s Dapit Alim, a healing and eco-tourism destination up in the mountain in Tubod, the capital town. The 5.5-hectare retreat place is heavily reforested since Fr. Galenzoga is also a strong advocate of forest conservation. Both Christians and Muslims visit the place that is basically a center for prayer, reconciliation and holistic healing.

  • REJECTED BY LBC BECAUSE THE PLANTS HAVE ROOTS! – Photo shows the rooted cuttings of black pepper that were supposed to be shipped from Antipolo City to a customer in Iligan City.  When the editor of this page brought the plants for shipment to the LBC office in Antipolo City, the man on duty said that they don’t accept for shipping plants with roots. We know that black pepper is not one of the crops that are banned from being transported to the south. We also know that items that could cause explosion, such as fertilizers, are also banned in air shipment. But rooted cuttings of black pepper can not cause any explosion on board the plane. What could be the reason for LBC not to accept the bare root cuttings for shipment? Things like this have negative impact on agriculture.

    REJECTED BY LBC BECAUSE THE PLANTS HAVE ROOTS! – Photo shows the rooted cuttings of black pepper that were supposed to be shipped from Antipolo City to a customer in Iligan City. When the editor of this page brought the plants for shipment to the LBC office in Antipolo City, the man on duty said that they don’t accept for shipping plants with roots. We know that black pepper is not one of the crops that are banned from being transported to the south. We also know that items that could cause explosion, such as fertilizers, are also banned in air shipment. But rooted cuttings of black pepper can not cause any explosion on board the plane. What could be the reason for LBC not to accept the bare root cuttings for shipment? Things like this have negative impact on agriculture.

That meant a gross value of P920,000. Discounting the other expenses, that included the cost of fingerlings (P5 each for the 5-6 inches), the operation was profitable. The return on investment (ROI) was 16%, according to Stephen Harun who is the fellow in charge of the fisheries projects in Lanao del Norte.

Harun said they also experimented in stocking pompano which is a high-value species. This species also grows very fast in saline water. The trouble is that the feed is very expensive – P1,800 per 50 kilo bag. While the price is high, pompano is not as fast-selling as bangus.

At present, they are stocking seabass or apahap. This is also a high-value fish that fetches about P200 per kilo. But the feed is not as expensive as that of pompano.

FISH FARMER-ADOPTORS – While the small fishermen cannot afford the high-cost of circular fish cages that cost millions of pesos, they have nevertheless adopted the technology by making their own fishpens out of bamboo and other local materials. And they are culturing bangus which are not only fast-growing, they are also better-tasting than the bangus cultured in freshwater.

From a distance, one can see hundreds of fish farmers’ fishpens not far from the shores of Pnaguil Bay. According to Harun, there are hundreds of fishpens not only in Tubod but also in the towns of Lala and Baroy.

They are culturing bangus for good reasons. For one, fingerlings are readily available. Bangus grows fast in Panguil Bay so that in a culture period of four months, two pieces could weigh a kilo. And the price is also very good. At the Maranding market in Lala town, we saw bangus being sold at P140 per kilo.

According to Harun, the harvests are not only sold in Lanao del Norte. Much of the production is sold as far as Pagadian City which is 76 kilometers away from Tubod.

****    ****    ****

COCO HUSK PROCESSING – During our recent trip to Lanao del Norte, we also met Leoncio Bagol, the general manager of the Matungao Community Cooperative which is in the business of processing coconut husk into coco peat, coco coir and twines for making geonet used in erosion control.

Lanao del Norte is a coconut producing province where copra making used to be the main source of income from coconut. Now, coconut husk byproducts are providing an additional source of livelihood for the families who are members of the Matungao co-op.

Coco peat or coir dust, a byproduct of coir extraction, is also in demand. The Philippine Coconut Authority itself requires no less than 25,000 sacks for Region 10. The PCA needs coco peat for its fertilization program. This is mixed with salt and then applied as fertilizer to the coconut trees. The price is P150 per 40-kilo sack.

Coco coir which is the fiber extracted from the coconut husk is made into twines and then woven into geonet for erosion control. One roll of geonet one meter wide and 56 meters long sells for P1,900. There are private companies that are buying geonet but the DPWH is one of the biggest. In Region 10 alone, according to Bagol, DPWH requires about 28,000 rolls.

The co-op is not only providing employment to the 50 workers in the factory. More important, some 500 households are making twines for the co-op in their homes. The twine maker earns P2 per 15-meter twine. In one week, a twine maker who is working not the full day may earn P800 to P1,000 a week.